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John Harbaugh
Head Coach
Age:
51
College:
Miami (OH)
Hometown:
Ann Arbor, MI
Experience:
17

Biography

Super Bowl-winning head coach John Harbaugh, who led the Ravens to the franchise’s second World Championship in 2012, enters his seventh season at the helm in Baltimore. Harbaugh has been historically good, with his teams earning the playoffs in five of his first six seasons, including the initial five (2008-12).

Though he never wants it to be about him, it’s getting more difficult to ignore Harbaugh’s very measurable success. Here’s a look, entering the 2014 season:

• Harbaugh is the only head coach in NFL history (since 1970 merger) to win a playoff game in each of his first four and five seasons.

• In 2012, Harbaugh became the third head coach in NFL history to guide his team to the playoffs in each of his first five seasons, with Baltimore owning a 9-4 postseason mark during his tenure.

• The 2012 Ravens won Super Bowl XLVII, 34-31, over the San Francisco 49ers in one of the most dramatic games in NFL history. Baltimore jumped out to a 28-6 lead, but needed a critical goal-line stand late in the fourth quarter to help seal the victory. The Ravens overcame a furious second-half comeback and a 34-minute power outage at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans to clinch the franchise’s second World Championship.

• Under Harbaugh’s guidance, the Ravens have appeared in three AFC Championship games (2008, 2011, 2012) and have won at least one playoff game during each of their five postseasons with him as head coach.

• John and his younger brother, Jim (2011, 2012 and 2013), the 49ers’ head coach, are the only NFL head coaches to reach three conference championships in the first five seasons of a coaching career.

• “Harbs” owns the NFL’s fourth-best winning percentage (.651) among active head coaches, compiling a 71-38 overall record (including playoffs). For active head coaches who’ve coached a minimum of 60 games, Harbaugh ranks second behind Bill Belichick (.657).

• Harbaugh’s .692 postseason winning percentage (9-4 playoff mark) ranks first among active coaches.

• Baltimore’s 71 total victories since Harbaugh’s arrival in 2008 rank second most in the NFL, while the team’s 62 regular season wins during that time stand third.

• Under Harbaugh, the Ravens have posted a 39-9 mark at M&T Bank Stadium over the past six seasons, ranking as the NFL’s second-best home record during that span (2008-13).

• Entering 2014, the Ravens, Colts, Patriots and Packers are the only teams to earn a playoff berth in five of the previous six seasons.

From his job interview with the Ravens, to his first press conference, to his consistent action and talk about the Ravens, it is all about “the team” for Harbaugh. Signs can be seen around the Ravens’ training complex: “The Team, The Team, The Team.”

“My coaching philosophy can be summed up easily,” said Harbaugh, the third head coach in Ravens history, following Ted Marchibroda (1996-98) and Brian Billick (1999-2007). “The three most important things are the team, the team and the team. Everything we do is to make the team better. Individuals can let their lights shine, and we encourage that. But, nothing should detract from making the team better.”

Despite his early success, “Harbs” diffuses accolades: “It’s about us. It’s about the team. It’s about the players, the coaches, Steve [Bisciotti], Ozzie [Newsome] and the scouts. It’s about Dick [Cass] and the support staff. It’s about all of us pulling together to win – to be the best.”

Unlike other NFL head coaches, “Harbs” took the road less traveled. Most NFL field bosses graduate from pro jobs that include the word coordinator after offensive or defensive, or they emerge from heading big-time college programs. Before becoming the Ravens’ head coach in 2008, John was the Eagles’ secondary coach (2007), and prior to that, Philadelphia’s special teams coordinator (1998-2006) and a 14-year collegiate coach. (Harbaugh also grew up learning about the game from his father, Jack, a longtime college coach.)

In 1998, then-Eagles head coach Ray Rhodes originally hired Harbaugh, who quickly established a reputation as one of the NFL’s top special teams coaches. Subsequently, he was one of four assistants retained by Andy Reid in 1999.

Prior to hiring Harbaugh, the Ravens talked with over 30 people about the energetic coach. “Did we take a chance by hiring John? My belief is that you have to be willing to do things the masses don’t, or you’ll never separate yourself from the masses,” stated team owner Steve Bisciotti. “We obviously picked the right person.”

Simply put, Harbaugh strives to be the best. “We don’t want to just win a championship. We want to be a championship team,” he stated. “We want to become something. We seek the highest levels.”

His teams are balanced, disciplined and hard-nosed. “We want to be the most physical team, but we also want to be the cleanest. Hard-hitting and playing with physicality does not mean dirty,” he added.

A year-by-year look at Harbaugh’s career:

2013: For the first time since Harbaugh’s 2008 arrival, Baltimore did not make the playoffs, falling one game short with an 8-8 mark and placing third in the AFC North…The Ravens were 3-3 in the division, splitting the series with all three rivals…Baltimore played an NFL-high nine games decided by 3 points or less, compiling a 5-4 record in those contests…How close were the Ravens to making the playoffs? They were tied 17-17 near the end of the third quarter in the season-ending loss at Cincinnati, needing a victory to secure what would have been their sixth-straight postseason berth…OLB Terrell Suggs (10) and OLB Elvis Dumervil (9.5) combined for 19.5 sacks, with Suggs earning his sixth Pro Bowl invite…NT Haloti Ngata was elected to his fifth Pro Bowl, while CB Lardarius Webb’s 22 PD ranked as the NFL’s second most…WR Torrey Smith tallied 1,128 receiving yards, the second most in single-season team history (Michael Jackson - 1,201 in 1996) and had a career-high 65 catches, posting the NFL’s fifth-best yards-per-catch average (17.4)…Undrafted rookie WR Marlon Brown’s 7 receiving TDs tied (Torrey Smith, 2011) for the most by a rookie in team history, while he also finished second (Smith, 2011) in catches (49) and receiving yards (524) by a Ravens’ rookie…Pro Bowl K Justin Tucker set franchise records in FGs made (38) and FGs attempted (41) and produced a franchise-record 140 points (tied for sixth in NFL)…Tucker also had 6 FGs of 50-plus yards and kicked 3 game-winning FGs, including a team-record 61-yarder at Detroit…G Marshal Yanda also earned his third Pro Bowl honor.

2012: The Ravens captured a second-consecutive AFC North title with a 10-6 mark before sweeping four playoff games to win Super Bowl XLVII: 24-9 over the visiting Colts on Wild Card weekend; 38-35 in double overtime at Denver in the Divisional Round; 28-13 at New England in the AFC Championship – shutting out the Patriots, who owned the league’s top offense, in the second half; and then topping the 49ers, 34-31, in New Orleans after jumping to a 28-6 third-quarter lead…Showing a resolve that was a hallmark of that championship team, the Ravens overcame a three-game December losing streak and 53 games lost to defensive starters to win the title…Baltimore became the only NFL team to make the playoffs in each season from 2008-12 – with the Ravens also winning at least one playoff game each year…Baltimore set a single-season franchise record by scoring 398 points, averaging the NFL’s 10th-most points per game (24.9)…The Ravens scored a team-record 254 points at home, producing the NFL’s fourth-best home average of 31.8 ppg…Baltimore also surrendered just 16 give-aways, setting a franchise single-season record low…The Ravens’ special teams units were spectacular: In addition to posting a league-best (tied, Darius Reynaud) 3 kick return TDs (108- & 105-yard KORs and 63-yard PR), WR/RS Jacoby Jones led the NFL in KOR average (30.7)…Rookie K Justin Tucker, an undrafted free agent signing, made 30 of 33 FGAs (90.9%), producing the second-best success rate in Ravens single-season history and the second-best mark by a rookie kicker in NFL history…En route to winning Super Bowl XLVII, the Ravens produced one of the most electrifying postseasons in NFL history by averaging 410.3 yards of offense (134.8 rush & 275.5 pass) per game, scoring 31.0 points per contest and allowing just 22.0…WR Anquan Boldin recorded 22 catches for 380 yards and 4 TDs, while Jones posted a 29.4 receiving average (5 for 147), catching TDs of 70 and 56 yards (Jones also had a 108-yard KOR-TD in the Super Bowl.)…With a 3-TD performance vs. the 49ers, QB Joe Flacco threw 11 TD passes in the postseason, tying the NFL single-postseason record shared by Joe Montana (1989) and Kurt Warner (2008)…Flacco finished the Super Bowl 22-of-33 for 287 yards to produce a 124.2 rating (eighth-best mark in SB history) and earned game MVP honors…The Ravens’ defense was also stout during the playoffs, registering 10 take-aways (6 INTs and 4 FRs) to produce a +6 turnover differential…For their regular season efforts, six Ravens earned Pro Bowl honors: S Ed Reed (ninth), DT Haloti Ngata (fourth), FB Vonta Leach (third), RB Ray Rice (third), G Marshal Yanda (second) and Jones (first).

2011: Producing a second-straight 12-4 record (13-5 overall), Baltimore won the AFC North, sweeping the division for the first time in team history…The Ravens were 6-0 against playoff teams (7-1 including postseason), matching Green Bay as the only clubs to go undefeated in division play and against other postseason qualifiers during the regular season…In what was a franchise first, the Ravens also went unbeaten at home (9-0 with a playoff victory over Houston)…Baltimore earned a 20-13 Divisional Round victory over the Texans, and then fell, 23-20, in a heartbreaking AFC Championship thriller at New England…The Ravens’ defense, which finished No. 3 in the league in fewest points permitted (16.6) for the fourth-straight year, tied an NFL record for consecutive seasons of being in the Top 3 for points allowed…RB Ray Rice produced a career-high and NFL-best 2,068 yards from scrimmage, ranking second in rushing (1,364)...Rice also set a team mark with 15 total TDs…WR Torrey Smith was third among NFL rookies with 841 receiving yards (50 catches); his receptions and yards, plus 7 TDs, set new Ravens first-year standards…Eight Ravens earned Pro Bowl honors: LB Ray Lewis (13th), S Ed Reed (eighth), OLB Terrell Suggs (fifth), DT Haloti Ngata (third), FB Vonta Leach (second), Rice (second), G Ben Grubbs (first) and G Marshal Yanda (first)…Suggs was also named the 2011 Associated Press Defensive Player of the Year, marking the fourth time a Raven has won the honor (Reed - 2004 and Lewis - 2003 & 2000).

2010: Baltimore tied Pittsburgh for the best record in the division at 12-4, but lost the AFC North on the division-record tiebreaker (5-1 to 4-2)…Baltimore, Indianapolis (an NFL record nine in a row) and Philadelphia became the only teams to make the playoffs from 2008-10…The 2010 campaign also marked the first time the Ravens ever earned the postseason three years in a row (the Ravens later extended their record to five years in 2012)…In the Wild Card game at Kansas City, the Ravens prevailed 30-7, becoming the only NFL team to win at least one playoff game in each of the last three seasons…Baltimore then dropped a 31-24 Divisional Round contest at Pittsburgh, which advanced to the Super Bowl…John Harbaugh became the first head coach in NFL history to take over a sub-.500 team and then win a playoff game in each of his first three seasons…Five Ravens earned Pro Bowl honors: K Billy Cundiff (first), LB Ray Lewis (12th), DT Haloti Ngata (second), S Ed Reed (seventh) and OLB Terrell Suggs (fourth)…WR Anquan Boldin tallied team highs of 64 catches and 837 receiving yards, while QB Joe Flacco produced career highs in TD passes (25) and passer rating (93.6)…RB Ray Rice finished with 1,776 yards from scrimmage, the NFL’s third most.

2009: After posting a 9-7 record, the Ravens produced their sixth playoff team of the decade (2000-09)...Behind the NFL’s ninth-ranked scoring offense (24.4 ppg) and a defense that finished third in total yards and points allowed (300.5 ypg/16.3 ppg), the Ravens upended the Patriots (33-14) in the Wild Card round, becoming the first road team to win a playoff game at New England since 1978...For the first time in team history, Baltimore had a 3,000-yard passer (Joe Flacco - 3,613), a 1,000-yard rusher (Ray Rice - 1,339) and a 1,000-yard receiver (Derrick Mason - 1,028) in the same season...Five Ravens were voted into the Pro Bowl, including LB Ray Lewis (11th), FB Le’Ron McClain (second), DT Haloti Ngata (first), S Ed Reed (sixth) and Rice (first), who tallied the NFL’s second-most yards from scrimmage (2,041)...Rookie T Michael Oher, who started all 16 games, finished second for Diet Pepsi Rookie of the Year (NFL.com fan vote) and earned All-Rookie team honors. 

2008: In Harbaugh’s initial Baltimore season, the Ravens produced an 11-5 record and advanced to the AFC Championship game after winning at Miami (27-9) and at the AFC’s top-seeded Tennessee Titans, 13-10…Pittsburgh, the eventual Super Bowl champion, stopped the Ravens (23-14) in the AFC title matchup at Heinz Field…This first Harbaugh/Ravens team tied the NFL record (since 1978) for turnarounds by a head coach taking over a sub-.500 team…The Ravens’ 2-1 playoff record following that regular season campaign established a new league standard in this same category…With the 13 total victories in 2008, Harbaugh set the NFL record for the most wins ever by a rookie head coach starting a rookie quarterback (Joe Flacco)…Baltimore’s stifling defense  ranked No. 2 in the NFL by allowing 261.1 yards per game and was No. 3 in points allowed per game (15.3)...Baltimore also produced an NFL-best 26 INTs, including five returned for touchdowns…Five players earned Pro Bowl honors: LB Ray Lewis (10th), S Ed Reed (fifth), ST Brendon Ayanbadejo (third), OLB Terrell Suggs (third) and FB Le’Ron McClain (first)…Flacco, who became the first rookie QB ever to win two playoff games, was named the Diet Pepsi Rookie of the Year (NFL.com fan vote).

ADDITIONAL RAVENS NOTES DURING HARBAUGH ERA: Impressively, the Ravens’ top four seasons for fewest turnovers have all occurred during Harbaugh’s tenure. In 2012, Baltimore set a franchise single-season record for fewest turnovers (16), breaking the previous mark of 20 from 2010. Constantly stressing attention to detail, Harbaugh’s 2010 and 2011 teams combined to produce the fewest penalties (182) over a two-year stretch in franchise history.

Maintaining a strong defensive tradition, the Ravens finished four (2008-11) of the past six seasons as the NFL’s No. 3 scoring defense (fewest points allowed) – tying an NFL record for consecutive seasons ranking in the Top 3. Harbaugh’s red zone defense has finished in the Top 5 in five of his six seasons, including first overall in 2011 and second in both 2012 and 2008.

The Ravens’ offense has also experienced record-setting successes during the Harbaugh Era. In 2013, Flacco set career highs in passing yards (3,912), completions (362) and attempts (614). Flacco’s completions and attempts also set new franchise marks, continuing to extend his title as the franchise’s all-time passing leader (1,869-of-3,103 for 21,545 yards and 121 touchdowns). Under Harbaugh’s guidance, Flacco has produced 62 regular season wins, the most by a starting quarterback in the first six seasons of a career. Three-time Pro Bowl RB Ray Rice has led the NFL in yards from scrimmage (8,487) since 2009, and in 2013, became the Ravens’ career leader in that category (9,214). During Baltimore’s 2012 Super Bowl-winning campaign, the Ravens set team records with 398 points scored and 72 plays of at least 20 yards gained (third most in the league).

On special teams, an impressive four Ravens players have earned Pro Bowl honors while playing for Harbaugh: ST Brendon Ayanbadejo (2008), K Billy Cundiff (2010), RS Jacoby Jones (2012) and K Justin Tucker (2013). A byproduct of the Ravens consistently producing one of the NFL’s top special teams units, during Harbaugh’s tenure (since 2008), Baltimore has posted the NFL’s No. 1 kickoff return average (25.0) and fourth-most KOR-TDs (five).

NFL ASSISTANT COACH: 1998-2007 (with Philadelphia) Harbaugh’s special teams in Philadelphia were consistently ranked among the NFL’s best. From 2000-05, the Eagles’ units finished in the Top 10 in five of those seasons in The Dallas Morning News’ comprehensive special teams rankings. In 2001 and 2003, Philly ranked No. 1, according to senior NFL writer Rick Gosselin’s composite (includes 22 kicking-game categories).

Following the 2001 campaign, Harbaugh was voted the NFL’s Special Teams Coach of the Year by his peers. He was also named The Dallas Morning News Special Teams Coach of the Year that season. In just four seasons (1998-2001), Harbaugh elevated the Eagles’ special teams units from 29th to first in the league.

In 1999, the Eagles signed K David Akers, who had been working as a part-time waiter after brief kicking stints with Carolina, Atlanta and Washington. With Harbaugh’s help, Akers became a three-time Pro Bowler. Harbaugh also worked with P Dirk Johnson, another “street” free agent, helping him record the then-Top 2 punting averages (38.4 in 2005 and 37.4 in 2004) in Eagles history. Under “Harbs,” 15 Eagles earned Special Teams Player of the Week awards, while snapper Mike Bartrum was named to the Pro Bowl, and RS Reno Mahe led the NFL with a 12.8 punt return average in 2005.

COLLEGE COACHING CAREER: Among John’s 30 years of coaching is a two-year stint (1995-96) as the assistant head coach at the University of Cincinnati, with the Bearcats finishing 6-5 both seasons. He coached 10 years on offense and four on defense at the collegiate level, launching his coaching career in 1984 at the age of 21 as a graduate assistant for his father at Western Michigan. In his second position at the University of Pittsburgh (1987), he was mentored by the legendary Sid Gillman, a Pro Football Hall of Famer. John also coached the tight ends at Pitt under head coach Mike Gottfried. While at Cincinnati (1989-96), Harbaugh coached special teams, tight ends, outside linebackers, running backs and was also the recruiting coordinator.

Over eight years, Harbaugh recruited 27 starters for the Bearcats and tutored both the NCAA’s top return man (former Raven Robert Tate, 34.3 KOR average in 1995) and the second-ranked returner (current Ravens assistant defensive backs coach Chris Hewitt, 31.5 KOR average in 1993). John was part of a staff that helped Cincinnati produce three out of four winning seasons (1993, 1995-96) for the first time in 20 years.

“Harbs” also coached one season at Indiana in 1997 as the defensive backs coach/special teams coordinator, under former Ravens offensive coordinator Cam Cameron, and one year at Morehead State in 1988 as the defensive backs coach/special teams and strength and conditioning coordinator.

COACHING HONORS: In April 2014, Harbaugh was inducted into Miami (OH) University’s “Cradle of Coaches Association” and was immortalized with a statue on the campus. The statue of Harbaugh joins existing Cradle of Coaches statues for Earl "Red" Blaik, Paul Brown, Carm Cozza, Paul Dietzel, Weeb Ewbank, Ara Parseghian, John Pont and Bo Schembechler. The Cradle of Coaches honors Miami graduates who have earned recognition as national collegiate or professional Coaches of the Year, who have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame or the Pro Football Hall of Fame, or whose teams won national collegiate or professional/Super Bowl championships.

Following the 2001 campaign during his time with the Eagles, Harbaugh was voted the NFL’s Special Teams Coach of the Year by his peers. He was also named The Dallas Morning News Special Teams Coach of the Year that season.

HARBAUGH COACHING FAMILY: Harbaugh is from a football family. His father, Jack, is a 41-year coaching veteran who won the 2002 NCAA Division I-AA football championship as the head coach at Western Kentucky. His younger brother Jim, who was the Ravens’ starting QB in 1998, played 14 seasons in the NFL and was named the San Francisco 49ers’ head coach in January 2011. In a showdown that featured the first-ever NFL game between head coaches who are brothers, John’s Ravens bested Jim’s 49ers, 16-6, in a 2011 Thanksgiving Night (Nov. 24) primetime special. The Ravens, of course, then topped the 49ers, 34-31, in Super Bowl XLVII. The brothers’ sister, Joani, is married to Indiana basketball coach Tom Crean.

COLLEGE: Harbaugh earned a degree in political science at Miami (OH), where he won the Football Scholar Athlete Award as a defensive back for the Redhawks. He earned his master’s in physical education at Western Michigan.

PERSONAL: Devoted to his family and his Christian faith, John is most active in helping the Baltimore area be better for families. He earned the 2011 “Power of Excellence Award” from the (Ben) Carson Scholars for “demonstrating excellence in life and being a role model.” He’s a board member for the Port Discovery Children’s Museum and a significant contributor to All Pro Dads, along with numerous Baltimore-area events and charities. Also a willing volunteer, his wife, Ingrid, contributes to both the Helping Up Mission and Sarah’s House.

Harbaugh has also been an advocate of the U.S. Military. The NFL awarded him its 2013 Salute to Service Award, acknowledging exceptional efforts by those in the league who honor and support military members. (Harbaugh was also a finalist for the award in 2011.) In 2012, Army Chief of Staff General Raymond Odierno presented him with the Outstanding Civilian Service Award. Harbaugh took part in the annual NFL-USO coaches’ tour of the Middle East in 2009, has visited numerous military bases in the U.S. and abroad (including a 2014 February trip to the Middle East), has purchased school supplies for children whose parents are serving in the military and has sent care packages to troops overseas.

In 2008, Harbaugh also helped institute Military Appreciation Day, an annual event that takes place during Ravens training camp. Since its establishment, an estimated 8,000 service members have enjoyed preferred seating and opportunities to meet with Ravens players and coaches each summer. Once the season begins, Harbaugh then invites wounded warriors to be his guests at every Ravens home game. A self-proclaimed history buff, during offseason team activities, Harbaugh has also taken the Ravens to Gettysburg, PA, to learn about the Civil War.

John, who attended Ann Arbor (MI) Pioneer HS, Ingrid, and their daughter, Alison, live in Reisterstown, MD.

Super Bowl-winning head coach John Harbaugh, who led the Ravens to the franchise’s second World Championship in 2012, enters his seventh season at the helm in Baltimore. Harbaugh has been historically good, with his teams earning the playoffs in five of his first six seasons, including the initial five (2008-12).

Though he never wants it to be about him, it’s getting more difficult to ignore Harbaugh’s very measurable success. Here’s a look, entering the 2014 season:

• Harbaugh is the only head coach in NFL history (since 1970 merger) to win a playoff game in each of his first four and five seasons.

• In 2012, Harbaugh became the third head coach in NFL history to guide his team to the playoffs in each of his first five seasons, with Baltimore owning a 9-4 postseason mark during his tenure.

• The 2012 Ravens won Super Bowl XLVII, 34-31, over the San Francisco 49ers in one of the most dramatic games in NFL history. Baltimore jumped out to a 28-6 lead, but needed a critical goal-line stand late in the fourth quarter to help seal the victory. The Ravens overcame a furious second-half comeback and a 34-minute power outage at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans to clinch the franchise’s second World Championship.

• Under Harbaugh’s guidance, the Ravens have appeared in three AFC Championship games (2008, 2011, 2012) and have won at least one playoff game during each of their five postseasons with him as head coach.

• John and his younger brother, Jim (2011, 2012 and 2013), the 49ers’ head coach, are the only NFL head coaches to reach three conference championships in the first five seasons of a coaching career.

• “Harbs” owns the NFL’s fourth-best winning percentage (.651) among active head coaches, compiling a 71-38 overall record (including playoffs). For active head coaches who’ve coached a minimum of 60 games, Harbaugh ranks second behind Bill Belichick (.657).

• Harbaugh’s .692 postseason winning percentage (9-4 playoff mark) ranks first among active coaches.

• Baltimore’s 71 total victories since Harbaugh’s arrival in 2008 rank second most in the NFL, while the team’s 62 regular season wins during that time stand third.

• Under Harbaugh, the Ravens have posted a 39-9 mark at M&T Bank Stadium over the past six seasons, ranking as the NFL’s second-best home record during that span (2008-13).

• Entering 2014, the Ravens, Colts, Patriots and Packers are the only teams to earn a playoff berth in five of the previous six seasons.

From his job interview with the Ravens, to his first press conference, to his consistent action and talk about the Ravens, it is all about “the team” for Harbaugh. Signs can be seen around the Ravens’ training complex: “The Team, The Team, The Team.”

“My coaching philosophy can be summed up easily,” said Harbaugh, the third head coach in Ravens history, following Ted Marchibroda (1996-98) and Brian Billick (1999-2007). “The three most important things are the team, the team and the team. Everything we do is to make the team better. Individuals can let their lights shine, and we encourage that. But, nothing should detract from making the team better.”

Despite his early success, “Harbs” diffuses accolades: “It’s about us. It’s about the team. It’s about the players, the coaches, Steve [Bisciotti], Ozzie [Newsome] and the scouts. It’s about Dick [Cass] and the support staff. It’s about all of us pulling together to win – to be the best.”

Unlike other NFL head coaches, “Harbs” took the road less traveled. Most NFL field bosses graduate from pro jobs that include the word coordinator after offensive or defensive, or they emerge from heading big-time college programs. Before becoming the Ravens’ head coach in 2008, John was the Eagles’ secondary coach (2007), and prior to that, Philadelphia’s special teams coordinator (1998-2006) and a 14-year collegiate coach. (Harbaugh also grew up learning about the game from his father, Jack, a longtime college coach.)

In 1998, then-Eagles head coach Ray Rhodes originally hired Harbaugh, who quickly established a reputation as one of the NFL’s top special teams coaches. Subsequently, he was one of four assistants retained by Andy Reid in 1999.

Prior to hiring Harbaugh, the Ravens talked with over 30 people about the energetic coach. “Did we take a chance by hiring John? My belief is that you have to be willing to do things the masses don’t, or you’ll never separate yourself from the masses,” stated team owner Steve Bisciotti. “We obviously picked the right person.”

Simply put, Harbaugh strives to be the best. “We don’t want to just win a championship. We want to be a championship team,” he stated. “We want to become something. We seek the highest levels.”

His teams are balanced, disciplined and hard-nosed. “We want to be the most physical team, but we also want to be the cleanest. Hard-hitting and playing with physicality does not mean dirty,” he added.

A year-by-year look at Harbaugh’s career:

2013: For the first time since Harbaugh’s 2008 arrival, Baltimore did not make the playoffs, falling one game short with an 8-8 mark and placing third in the AFC North…The Ravens were 3-3 in the division, splitting the series with all three rivals…Baltimore played an NFL-high nine games decided by 3 points or less, compiling a 5-4 record in those contests…How close were the Ravens to making the playoffs? They were tied 17-17 near the end of the third quarter in the season-ending loss at Cincinnati, needing a victory to secure what would have been their sixth-straight postseason berth…OLB Terrell Suggs (10) and OLB Elvis Dumervil (9.5) combined for 19.5 sacks, with Suggs earning his sixth Pro Bowl invite…NT Haloti Ngata was elected to his fifth Pro Bowl, while CB Lardarius Webb’s 22 PD ranked as the NFL’s second most…WR Torrey Smith tallied 1,128 receiving yards, the second most in single-season team history (Michael Jackson - 1,201 in 1996) and had a career-high 65 catches, posting the NFL’s fifth-best yards-per-catch average (17.4)…Undrafted rookie WR Marlon Brown’s 7 receiving TDs tied (Torrey Smith, 2011) for the most by a rookie in team history, while he also finished second (Smith, 2011) in catches (49) and receiving yards (524) by a Ravens’ rookie…Pro Bowl K Justin Tucker set franchise records in FGs made (38) and FGs attempted (41) and produced a franchise-record 140 points (tied for sixth in NFL)…Tucker also had 6 FGs of 50-plus yards and kicked 3 game-winning FGs, including a team-record 61-yarder at Detroit…G Marshal Yanda also earned his third Pro Bowl honor.

2012: The Ravens captured a second-consecutive AFC North title with a 10-6 mark before sweeping four playoff games to win Super Bowl XLVII: 24-9 over the visiting Colts on Wild Card weekend; 38-35 in double overtime at Denver in the Divisional Round; 28-13 at New England in the AFC Championship – shutting out the Patriots, who owned the league’s top offense, in the second half; and then topping the 49ers, 34-31, in New Orleans after jumping to a 28-6 third-quarter lead…Showing a resolve that was a hallmark of that championship team, the Ravens overcame a three-game December losing streak and 53 games lost to defensive starters to win the title…Baltimore became the only NFL team to make the playoffs in each season from 2008-12 – with the Ravens also winning at least one playoff game each year…Baltimore set a single-season franchise record by scoring 398 points, averaging the NFL’s 10th-most points per game (24.9)…The Ravens scored a team-record 254 points at home, producing the NFL’s fourth-best home average of 31.8 ppg…Baltimore also surrendered just 16 give-aways, setting a franchise single-season record low…The Ravens’ special teams units were spectacular: In addition to posting a league-best (tied, Darius Reynaud) 3 kick return TDs (108- & 105-yard KORs and 63-yard PR), WR/RS Jacoby Jones led the NFL in KOR average (30.7)…Rookie K Justin Tucker, an undrafted free agent signing, made 30 of 33 FGAs (90.9%), producing the second-best success rate in Ravens single-season history and the second-best mark by a rookie kicker in NFL history…En route to winning Super Bowl XLVII, the Ravens produced one of the most electrifying postseasons in NFL history by averaging 410.3 yards of offense (134.8 rush & 275.5 pass) per game, scoring 31.0 points per contest and allowing just 22.0…WR Anquan Boldin recorded 22 catches for 380 yards and 4 TDs, while Jones posted a 29.4 receiving average (5 for 147), catching TDs of 70 and 56 yards (Jones also had a 108-yard KOR-TD in the Super Bowl.)…With a 3-TD performance vs. the 49ers, QB Joe Flacco threw 11 TD passes in the postseason, tying the NFL single-postseason record shared by Joe Montana (1989) and Kurt Warner (2008)…Flacco finished the Super Bowl 22-of-33 for 287 yards to produce a 124.2 rating (eighth-best mark in SB history) and earned game MVP honors…The Ravens’ defense was also stout during the playoffs, registering 10 take-aways (6 INTs and 4 FRs) to produce a +6 turnover differential…For their regular season efforts, six Ravens earned Pro Bowl honors: S Ed Reed (ninth), DT Haloti Ngata (fourth), FB Vonta Leach (third), RB Ray Rice (third), G Marshal Yanda (second) and Jones (first).

2011: Producing a second-straight 12-4 record (13-5 overall), Baltimore won the AFC North, sweeping the division for the first time in team history…The Ravens were 6-0 against playoff teams (7-1 including postseason), matching Green Bay as the only clubs to go undefeated in division play and against other postseason qualifiers during the regular season…In what was a franchise first, the Ravens also went unbeaten at home (9-0 with a playoff victory over Houston)…Baltimore earned a 20-13 Divisional Round victory over the Texans, and then fell, 23-20, in a heartbreaking AFC Championship thriller at New England…The Ravens’ defense, which finished No. 3 in the league in fewest points permitted (16.6) for the fourth-straight year, tied an NFL record for consecutive seasons of being in the Top 3 for points allowed…RB Ray Rice produced a career-high and NFL-best 2,068 yards from scrimmage, ranking second in rushing (1,364)...Rice also set a team mark with 15 total TDs…WR Torrey Smith was third among NFL rookies with 841 receiving yards (50 catches); his receptions and yards, plus 7 TDs, set new Ravens first-year standards…Eight Ravens earned Pro Bowl honors: LB Ray Lewis (13th), S Ed Reed (eighth), OLB Terrell Suggs (fifth), DT Haloti Ngata (third), FB Vonta Leach (second), Rice (second), G Ben Grubbs (first) and G Marshal Yanda (first)…Suggs was also named the 2011 Associated Press Defensive Player of the Year, marking the fourth time a Raven has won the honor (Reed - 2004 and Lewis - 2003 & 2000).

2010: Baltimore tied Pittsburgh for the best record in the division at 12-4, but lost the AFC North on the division-record tiebreaker (5-1 to 4-2)…Baltimore, Indianapolis (an NFL record nine in a row) and Philadelphia became the only teams to make the playoffs from 2008-10…The 2010 campaign also marked the first time the Ravens ever earned the postseason three years in a row (the Ravens later extended their record to five years in 2012)…In the Wild Card game at Kansas City, the Ravens prevailed 30-7, becoming the only NFL team to win at least one playoff game in each of the last three seasons…Baltimore then dropped a 31-24 Divisional Round contest at Pittsburgh, which advanced to the Super Bowl…John Harbaugh became the first head coach in NFL history to take over a sub-.500 team and then win a playoff game in each of his first three seasons…Five Ravens earned Pro Bowl honors: K Billy Cundiff (first), LB Ray Lewis (12th), DT Haloti Ngata (second), S Ed Reed (seventh) and OLB Terrell Suggs (fourth)…WR Anquan Boldin tallied team highs of 64 catches and 837 receiving yards, while QB Joe Flacco produced career highs in TD passes (25) and passer rating (93.6)…RB Ray Rice finished with 1,776 yards from scrimmage, the NFL’s third most.

2009: After posting a 9-7 record, the Ravens produced their sixth playoff team of the decade (2000-09)...Behind the NFL’s ninth-ranked scoring offense (24.4 ppg) and a defense that finished third in total yards and points allowed (300.5 ypg/16.3 ppg), the Ravens upended the Patriots (33-14) in the Wild Card round, becoming the first road team to win a playoff game at New England since 1978...For the first time in team history, Baltimore had a 3,000-yard passer (Joe Flacco - 3,613), a 1,000-yard rusher (Ray Rice - 1,339) and a 1,000-yard receiver (Derrick Mason - 1,028) in the same season...Five Ravens were voted into the Pro Bowl, including LB Ray Lewis (11th), FB Le’Ron McClain (second), DT Haloti Ngata (first), S Ed Reed (sixth) and Rice (first), who tallied the NFL’s second-most yards from scrimmage (2,041)...Rookie T Michael Oher, who started all 16 games, finished second for Diet Pepsi Rookie of the Year (NFL.com fan vote) and earned All-Rookie team honors. 

2008: In Harbaugh’s initial Baltimore season, the Ravens produced an 11-5 record and advanced to the AFC Championship game after winning at Miami (27-9) and at the AFC’s top-seeded Tennessee Titans, 13-10…Pittsburgh, the eventual Super Bowl champion, stopped the Ravens (23-14) in the AFC title matchup at Heinz Field…This first Harbaugh/Ravens team tied the NFL record (since 1978) for turnarounds by a head coach taking over a sub-.500 team…The Ravens’ 2-1 playoff record following that regular season campaign established a new league standard in this same category…With the 13 total victories in 2008, Harbaugh set the NFL record for the most wins ever by a rookie head coach starting a rookie quarterback (Joe Flacco)…Baltimore’s stifling defense  ranked No. 2 in the NFL by allowing 261.1 yards per game and was No. 3 in points allowed per game (15.3)...Baltimore also produced an NFL-best 26 INTs, including five returned for touchdowns…Five players earned Pro Bowl honors: LB Ray Lewis (10th), S Ed Reed (fifth), ST Brendon Ayanbadejo (third), OLB Terrell Suggs (third) and FB Le’Ron McClain (first)…Flacco, who became the first rookie QB ever to win two playoff games, was named the Diet Pepsi Rookie of the Year (NFL.com fan vote).

ADDITIONAL RAVENS NOTES DURING HARBAUGH ERA: Impressively, the Ravens’ top four seasons for fewest turnovers have all occurred during Harbaugh’s tenure. In 2012, Baltimore set a franchise single-season record for fewest turnovers (16), breaking the previous mark of 20 from 2010. Constantly stressing attention to detail, Harbaugh’s 2010 and 2011 teams combined to produce the fewest penalties (182) over a two-year stretch in franchise history.

Maintaining a strong defensive tradition, the Ravens finished four (2008-11) of the past six seasons as the NFL’s No. 3 scoring defense (fewest points allowed) – tying an NFL record for consecutive seasons ranking in the Top 3. Harbaugh’s red zone defense has finished in the Top 5 in five of his six seasons, including first overall in 2011 and second in both 2012 and 2008.

The Ravens’ offense has also experienced record-setting successes during the Harbaugh Era. In 2013, Flacco set career highs in passing yards (3,912), completions (362) and attempts (614). Flacco’s completions and attempts also set new franchise marks, continuing to extend his title as the franchise’s all-time passing leader (1,869-of-3,103 for 21,545 yards and 121 touchdowns). Under Harbaugh’s guidance, Flacco has produced 62 regular season wins, the most by a starting quarterback in the first six seasons of a career. Three-time Pro Bowl RB Ray Rice has led the NFL in yards from scrimmage (8,487) since 2009, and in 2013, became the Ravens’ career leader in that category (9,214). During Baltimore’s 2012 Super Bowl-winning campaign, the Ravens set team records with 398 points scored and 72 plays of at least 20 yards gained (third most in the league).

On special teams, an impressive four Ravens players have earned Pro Bowl honors while playing for Harbaugh: ST Brendon Ayanbadejo (2008), K Billy Cundiff (2010), RS Jacoby Jones (2012) and K Justin Tucker (2013). A byproduct of the Ravens consistently producing one of the NFL’s top special teams units, during Harbaugh’s tenure (since 2008), Baltimore has posted the NFL’s No. 1 kickoff return average (25.0) and fourth-most KOR-TDs (five).

NFL ASSISTANT COACH: 1998-2007 (with Philadelphia) Harbaugh’s special teams in Philadelphia were consistently ranked among the NFL’s best. From 2000-05, the Eagles’ units finished in the Top 10 in five of those seasons in The Dallas Morning News’ comprehensive special teams rankings. In 2001 and 2003, Philly ranked No. 1, according to senior NFL writer Rick Gosselin’s composite (includes 22 kicking-game categories).

Following the 2001 campaign, Harbaugh was voted the NFL’s Special Teams Coach of the Year by his peers. He was also named The Dallas Morning News Special Teams Coach of the Year that season. In just four seasons (1998-2001), Harbaugh elevated the Eagles’ special teams units from 29th to first in the league.

In 1999, the Eagles signed K David Akers, who had been working as a part-time waiter after brief kicking stints with Carolina, Atlanta and Washington. With Harbaugh’s help, Akers became a three-time Pro Bowler. Harbaugh also worked with P Dirk Johnson, another “street” free agent, helping him record the then-Top 2 punting averages (38.4 in 2005 and 37.4 in 2004) in Eagles history. Under “Harbs,” 15 Eagles earned Special Teams Player of the Week awards, while snapper Mike Bartrum was named to the Pro Bowl, and RS Reno Mahe led the NFL with a 12.8 punt return average in 2005.

COLLEGE COACHING CAREER: Among John’s 30 years of coaching is a two-year stint (1995-96) as the assistant head coach at the University of Cincinnati, with the Bearcats finishing 6-5 both seasons. He coached 10 years on offense and four on defense at the collegiate level, launching his coaching career in 1984 at the age of 21 as a graduate assistant for his father at Western Michigan. In his second position at the University of Pittsburgh (1987), he was mentored by the legendary Sid Gillman, a Pro Football Hall of Famer. John also coached the tight ends at Pitt under head coach Mike Gottfried. While at Cincinnati (1989-96), Harbaugh coached special teams, tight ends, outside linebackers, running backs and was also the recruiting coordinator.

Over eight years, Harbaugh recruited 27 starters for the Bearcats and tutored both the NCAA’s top return man (former Raven Robert Tate, 34.3 KOR average in 1995) and the second-ranked returner (current Ravens assistant defensive backs coach Chris Hewitt, 31.5 KOR average in 1993). John was part of a staff that helped Cincinnati produce three out of four winning seasons (1993, 1995-96) for the first time in 20 years.

“Harbs” also coached one season at Indiana in 1997 as the defensive backs coach/special teams coordinator, under former Ravens offensive coordinator Cam Cameron, and one year at Morehead State in 1988 as the defensive backs coach/special teams and strength and conditioning coordinator.

COACHING HONORS: In April 2014, Harbaugh was inducted into Miami (OH) University’s “Cradle of Coaches Association” and was immortalized with a statue on the campus. The statue of Harbaugh joins existing Cradle of Coaches statues for Earl "Red" Blaik, Paul Brown, Carm Cozza, Paul Dietzel, Weeb Ewbank, Ara Parseghian, John Pont and Bo Schembechler. The Cradle of Coaches honors Miami graduates who have earned recognition as national collegiate or professional Coaches of the Year, who have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame or the Pro Football Hall of Fame, or whose teams won national collegiate or professional/Super Bowl championships.

Following the 2001 campaign during his time with the Eagles, Harbaugh was voted the NFL’s Special Teams Coach of the Year by his peers. He was also named The Dallas Morning News Special Teams Coach of the Year that season.

HARBAUGH COACHING FAMILY: Harbaugh is from a football family. His father, Jack, is a 41-year coaching veteran who won the 2002 NCAA Division I-AA football championship as the head coach at Western Kentucky. His younger brother Jim, who was the Ravens’ starting QB in 1998, played 14 seasons in the NFL and was named the San Francisco 49ers’ head coach in January 2011. In a showdown that featured the first-ever NFL game between head coaches who are brothers, John’s Ravens bested Jim’s 49ers, 16-6, in a 2011 Thanksgiving Night (Nov. 24) primetime special. The Ravens, of course, then topped the 49ers, 34-31, in Super Bowl XLVII. The brothers’ sister, Joani, is married to Indiana basketball coach Tom Crean.

COLLEGE: Harbaugh earned a degree in political science at Miami (OH), where he won the Football Scholar Athlete Award as a defensive back for the Redhawks. He earned his master’s in physical education at Western Michigan.

PERSONAL: Devoted to his family and his Christian faith, John is most active in helping the Baltimore area be better for families. He earned the 2011 “Power of Excellence Award” from the (Ben) Carson Scholars for “demonstrating excellence in life and being a role model.” He’s a board member for the Port Discovery Children’s Museum and a significant contributor to All Pro Dads, along with numerous Baltimore-area events and charities. Also a willing volunteer, his wife, Ingrid, contributes to both the Helping Up Mission and Sarah’s House.

Harbaugh has also been an advocate of the U.S. Military. The NFL awarded him its 2013 Salute to Service Award, acknowledging exceptional efforts by those in the league who honor and support military members. (Harbaugh was also a finalist for the award in 2011.) In 2012, Army Chief of Staff General Raymond Odierno presented him with the Outstanding Civilian Service Award. Harbaugh took part in the annual NFL-USO coaches’ tour of the Middle East in 2009, has visited numerous military bases in the U.S. and abroad (including a 2014 February trip to the Middle East), has purchased school supplies for children whose parents are serving in the military and has sent care packages to troops overseas.

In 2008, Harbaugh also helped institute Military Appreciation Day, an annual event that takes place during Ravens training camp. Since its establishment, an estimated 8,000 service members have enjoyed preferred seating and opportunities to meet with Ravens players and coaches each summer. Once the season begins, Harbaugh then invites wounded warriors to be his guests at every Ravens home game. A self-proclaimed history buff, during offseason team activities, Harbaugh has also taken the Ravens to Gettysburg, PA, to learn about the Civil War.

John, who attended Ann Arbor (MI) Pioneer HS, Ingrid, and their daughter, Alison, live in Reisterstown, MD.

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